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7 horrible sex tips you recieve from friends

Trust your friends with your life but not with medical advice.

A friend in need is a friend indeed, but not when you need sound medical advice regarding problems in the bedroom. We often confide to our close friends about our sexual problems and sometimes seek their wise counsel. But more often than not, their advice is just a mixture of myths and half-baked info they've pulled out of the internet. A friend once told me that vigorous push-ups and sit ups after unprotected sex could stop pregnancy from happening; and worse, if you are already knocked up, the intense physical exertion could cause an abortion. On an unrelated note, today she has two unplanned kids. Here is a compilation of six ridiculous sex tips you are most likely to receive from friends.

#1 Pull out technique is better than the condom: Maybe your friends don't know that even the pull-out technique is scientifically considered an ineffective form of contraception which should be used after all other methods are exhausted. That's because sometimes the precum can contain sperm cells. That's not all. Pull out technique may work with a monogamous sexual partner. It does nothing to protect you from sexually transmitted diseases if you have multiple partners.12

#2 Use emergency contraceptive instead of a condom: If you have ever received this advice from a friend, ladies, it's a cue from the universe to end the friendship. It's called "emergency" contraceptives for a reason; when all other methods fail, this should be your last resort. Gynaecologists all over the world warn against ECP abuse and blame it for causing a host of female health problems.3

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#3 Have sex during periods to avoid pregnancy: Although not many women would be excited about having sex during their periods, some report feeling hornier close to their menses. Also, it is by-and-large a safe period (pardon the pun) for pregnancy but not for STDs. In fact, studies have shown that period sex is a big risk factor for the transmission of STDs since people avoid wearing condoms.4 And as far as pregnancy goes, it all depends on the length of the cycle. The sperm cells hang out inside the uterus for up to seven days; and if the woman enters her fertile period, the sly sperm cell could end up fertilising an egg.

#4 You can get pregnant from swallowing semen: Short answer: NO! Long answer: not possible, since the sperm has to come in contact with the uterus and egg for pregnancy to happen and those organs are not situated within the human digestive system.

#5 Standing up after he ejaculates inside you will prevent pregnancy: If things were that simple, why would scientists spend every waking moment of their lives looking for safer and more effective modes of contraception. Once the sperm enters the body, there is nothing you could do to undo that. Although there is some leakage, by the time you stand up, the fastest sperm cell is already making its way to the ovum.

#6 Having endometriosis/PCOS will protect you from pregnancy: Well, it will be difficult for you to get pregnant if you have those conditions. But you won't be magically immune from pregnancy. If all your stars are aligned, you could get pregnant despite your medical conditions. And again, it doesn't guarantee protection from STDs.

#7 Two condoms are safer than one: In the event of a breakage, the second condom could come to your rescue. The problem is that two condoms can cause friction and increase the chance of breakage. In conclusion, here's a piece of advice from a well wisher: Ladies and gentlemen, when in need of sex advice, approach a doctor who has spend his money and time at a medical school instead of friends with their half-baked knowledge.

References:

1. Hatcher, R. A., & Nelson, A. L. (2007). Contraceptive technology. Ardent Media.

2.Horner, J. R., Salazar, L. F., Romer, D., Vanable, P. A., DiClemente, R., Carey, M. P., Brown, L. K. (2009). Withdrawal (Coitus Interruptus) as a Sexual Risk Reduction Strategy: Perspectives from African-American Adolescents. Archives of Sexual Behavior, 38(5), 779 787. http://doi.org/10.1007/s10508-007-9304-y

3.Emergency contraception. (2003). Paediatrics & Child Health, 8(3), 181 183.

4.Tanfer, K., & Aral, S. O. (1996). Sexual Intercourse During Menstruation and Self Reported Sexually Transmitted Disease History Among Women. Sexually transmitted diseases, 23(5), 395-401.

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