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World Hypertension Day 2018: Why you should worry if you have hypertension along with diabetes

World Hypertension Day 2018: Why you should worry if you have hypertension along with diabetes

Chances of organ damage increases when one suffers from uncontrolled hypertension and diabetes together than suffering from diabetes with the blood pressure being in control.

Written by Debjani Arora |Published : May 17, 2018 1:39 PM IST

Both diabetes and hypertension are known as silent killers. They don t show any symptoms in the initial stages and so a person suffering from this deadly dual disease is often caught off guard when he reaches a point where attention (not prevention) becomes the only criterion. This is why they say preventive measures exercise and proper diet right from the early days can keep such lifestyle disorders at bay. But the human race has this innate tendency to embrace junk over healthy and nutritious foods, get complacent in a couch than sweating it out in the open grounds forgetting that the human body was not designed for such abuse and misuse. It is not surprising that we are touted as the global diabetes capital and the number of people suffering from hypertension is just increasing. Here is a handy guide for diabetics to consume fruits and manage blood sugar levels.

What was once thought as an old man s ailments diabetes, hypertension, kidney diseases are now being called lifestyle diseases as it is claiming its victims among the young and the able. For a while, doctors have been expressing their concerns that these lifestyle diseases are now becoming a norm in people who are in their late 20s and early 30s. Here is why the young urban Indians are at risk of heart attacks.

When we diagnose anyone with diabetes, we caution them that this disease doesn t come alone, it brings with it other diseases too. Usually, diabetes and hypertension are interlinked. Diabetes is a disease that affects the arterial and venous system of the body. It increases the chances of suffering from atherosclerosis or blockages in the heart. If a person is also suffering from hypertension or high blood pressure which increases the blood pressure in the arteries and keeps the arterial walls elevated all the time, this increases one s chances of suffering from cardiovascular complications like ischemic heart disease, coronary artery disease, risk of heart attack and heart failure, says Dr Roshani Gadge, consultant diabetologist, Gadge Diabetes Centre, Mumbai. Read to know what is the difference between heart attack and heart failure?

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Why you should worry:

Dr Gadge further adds that Earlier for people suffering from diabetes a blood pressure of less than 140/90 was also considered normal, but recently the guidelines have changed. According to the new guidelines, the systolic pressure should be less than 130 and diastolic pressure should be less than 80. So it is important to maintain the number at 130/80. It is important to keep your blood pressure in check if you are suffering from diabetes as hypertension is known to affect the other organs of the body. Read did you know there is no perfect blood pressure?

In hypertension, the blood vessels throughout the body remain dilated and the force of the blood against the artery walls is too high. This damages small capillaries and veins in every organ. If you have diabetes too, the intensity at which the damage can happen will only accelerate. Hypertension first affects the arteries of the heart which increases the risk of heart failure, heart attack and other cardiovascular damages. Next, it impacts the kidneys, eyes, brain and other organs too all of which could lead to life-threatening conditions like renal failure, blindness or even stroke respectively. When the sugar levels remain high it creates more pressure in the arteries.

This is why maintaining proper blood pressure, especially when you have diabetes becomes crucial. Chances of organ damage increases when one suffers from uncontrolled hypertension and diabetes together than suffering from diabetes with the blood pressure being in control, says Dr Gadge.

While treating diabetes it is also important to select drugs which can have a protective effect on the heart and kidneys. ARB drugs and ace inhibitors are better suited in this aspect. The right medication along with lifestyle changes, cholesterol management and corrective eating habits go a long way in keeping diabetes in check and lowering hypertension. The bonus is the major organs are even taken care off in the process, says Dr Gadge.

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