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Anterior Cruciate Ligament Tears: Internal Brace Is The Future Of ACL Treatment

Anterior Cruciate Ligament Tears: Internal Brace Is The Future Of ACL Treatment
Only 50% to 65% of recreational athletes return to their preinjury level of sports after ACL reconstruction surgery.

Read on to know about the advanced treatment of Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) tears, resulting from sports accidents or other knee injuries.

Written by Editorial Team |Published : March 28, 2023 8:45 PM IST

Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) reconstruction surgery has been linked to a graft healing process that can persist up to a year following surgery. Internal Brace Ligament has been demonstrated in recent years via several biomechanical and clinical studies to preserve the graft during these early postoperative periods and improve the result of ACL restoration.

Understanding ACL Tear Surgeries

Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) tears are a frequent injury caused by sports accidents or other knee injuries, with minimal variation between regions and nations, and are most common in working-age patients. Traditional literature has typically favoured ACL reconstruction over ACL repair as the current "gold standard" therapy for an ACL damage.

The outcome of ACL reconstruction surgery has been shown to be highly connected to the graft healing process, in which the graft develops and assimilates into the bone to form a new ligament, allowing it to fulfil its specified biomechanical function for up to 12 months following surgery.

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Suture augmentation has been created and examined in biomechanical models and clinical settings to restrict this occurrence, such as the technique of Internal Brace Ligament Augmentation (Arthrex), which has demonstrated benefits in terms of early postoperative healing.

The surgical history of ACL Tears

ACL reconstruction surgery is associated with a number of problems, including anterior knee pain (20%), kneeling pain (15%), hamstring muscle weakness following harvesting (10%), rotatory instability with a positive pivot shift (24%), rerupture (6%, up to 28% in high-risk populations), and clinical failure (10%), and only 50% to 65% of recreational athletes return to their preinjury level of sports.

Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) reconstruction surgery has been linked to a graft healing process that can persist up to a year following surgery. Suture augmentation has been created and examined in biomechanical models and clinical settings to restrict this occurrence, such as the technique of Internal Brace Ligament Augmentation (Arthrex), which has demonstrated benefits in terms of early postoperative healing.

Internal Brace Ligament Augmentation (IBLA) has been demonstrated in recent years via several biomechanical and clinical studies to preserve the graft during these early postoperative periods and improve the result of ACL restoration.

Outcomes of ACL surgeries performed with Internal Brace Technique

We began using the ACL repair augmented with InternalBrace technique at Nexus Day Surgery Centre due to our concerns about the high level of arthritis associated with traditional reconstruction (reported to be as high as 48% after 10 years). We were hopeful but did not expect it to be this successful. We observed that more than 80% of the repair patients did not require any type of reconstructive surgery on their knees. Those who did achieved a remarkable recovery following a second-stage revision treatment that used a smaller graft and was again supported by the Internal Brace.

The article is contributed by Dr Amyn Rajani, Arthroscopic Surgeon and Sports Injury Specialist from Nexus Day Surgery Centre.